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NASA 2011 STTR Phase II Solicitation


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-2 T1.03-9922
PHASE-1 CONTRACT NUMBER:NNX12CG04P
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Information Technologies for Intelligent Planetary Robotics
PROPOSAL TITLE: Anytime Summarization for Remote Robot Operations

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
TRACLabs, Inc.
100 North East Loop 410, Suite 520
San Antonio, TX 78216-1234
(281) 461-7886

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Brigham Young University
A-285 ASB
Provo, UT 84602-1231
(801) 422-3360

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Debra Schreckenghost
schreck@traclabs.com
100 North East Loop 410Suite 520
San Antonio,  TX 78216-1234
(281) 461-7886

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 3
End: 5

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
NASA plans to use intelligent planetary rovers to improve the productivity and safety of human explorers. A key challenge in using robots for human exploration is orienting remote personnel about robot operations, as latency and communication constraints make eyes-on monitoring impractical. Summary measures are needed to identify what progress the robot has made and, when progress is impeded, to indicate what went wrong. Trending measures also are needed that determine how well robotic assets are being utilized and identify opportunities to improve robot productivity. TRACLabs and Brigham Young University propose to develop software for anytime summarization to orient personnel quickly about the performance of planetary robots operating remotely, when data are limited, interrupted, or delayed. Thus an anytime summary must support personnel in understanding the operational situation without relying on vigilance monitoring. We successfully completed all Phase I objectives. We designed an approach for developing an anytime summarization web application. We identified candidate use cases to support Intelligent Robotics Group (IRG) tests. We designed and prototyped algorithms to summarize robot performance. We designed a web application with a graphical narrative interface (GNI) for exploring anytime summaries for different uses and perspectives. This web application integrates these interface clients with a performance data server and with the IRG Exploration Ground Data System (xGDS). In Phase II we will implement this Phase I design as a web application for anytime summarization. This software will compute and present information about robot performance including key performance indicators, significant events affecting performance, and expected performance under different operational conditions. It will build a new performance database for use by web clients, such as the GNI. This web application will be evaluated for use with NASA robots as part of the IRG xGDS.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
The Department of Defense has multiple prime contractors building small, unmanned ground vehicles. In this class are the iRobot Packbot, the Qiniteq TALON, and the Northrop Grumman Remotec ANDROS. These vehicles work closely with dismounted soldiers to perform tasks such as Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD), Urban Search and Rescue (USAR), and urban reconnaissance. DOD has increasingly relied on remotely operating these robots during such hazardous missions. The software for anytime summarization supports remote situation awareness of such operations. In the private sector, there is renewed interest in remote operations and robot inspection and maintenance for oil and natural gas drilling, extraction, and processing. Whether monitoring and controlling an off-shore oil rig from an on-shore location using both local and remote experts or controlling robots that monitor and maintain off-shore rigs during an evacuation, or controlling Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV) underwater, or controlling robots that perform disaster response tasks in large refinery, the need for robotics and automation in the oil and gas industry is growing. Such operations are hazardous, making remote operations desirable. Monitoring for key performance indicators and performance events is needed to ensure safety and to make operations more cost effective. The proposed anytime summarization aids situation awareness for remote operations and robot inspection and maintenance for the oil and gas industry.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
Anytime summarization supports crew-centered operations by assisting astronauts in understanding robot performance without eyes-on supervision. These summaries also help remote controllers come up to speed quickly when they cannot observe operations directly due to communication constraints. The proposed project will develop and evaluate quantifiable metrics for robot performance that can be applied at different levels of robot autonomy (NASA Roadmap TA4). The anytime summaries can be used while operations are ongoing, or used retrospectively. Applications during operations include summarizing performance for the engineering and field tests of NASA robots, such the upcoming In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) Regolith and Environment Science and Oxygen and Lunar Volatile Extraction (RESOLVE) engineering tests, or field tests with the K10 and KRex robot. Applications for use after an operation include summarizing performance for debriefing Space Station astronauts participating in the HET Surface Telerobotics (ST) test. For HET ST the anytime summary changes as new input are received from non-real-time sources, such as performance questionnaires, or user analysis. The proposed metrics for image quality and coverage should help science teams retrospectively find the best images collected during scientific data collection, such as that done for the Pavilion Lake Research Project.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Man-Machine Interaction
Robotics (see also Control & Monitoring; Sensors)
Image Processing
Data Processing


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-2 T2.01-9811
PHASE-1 CONTRACT NUMBER:NNX12CG06P
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Technologies for Aeronautics Experimental Capabilities
PROPOSAL TITLE: Hybrid Propulsion for Upper-Stage Boosters

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Exquadrum, Inc.
12130 Rancho Road
Adelanto, CA 92301-2703
(760) 246-0279

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
The University of Alabama in Huntsville
VBRH E-12
Huntsville, AL 35899-0000
(256) 824-2651

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Kevin Mahaffy
kevin.mahaffy@exquadrum.com
12130 Rancho Road
Adelanto,  CA 92301-2703
(760) 246-0279

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 4
End: 6

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
The objective of the proposed research and development effort is to demonstrate the feasibility of an innovative approach to high-performance hybrid propulsion for upper-stages. The missions for these propulsion systems include launching small- and nano-satellites and conducting hypersonic flight test operations. The focus of the research effort will be on achieving high specific impulse by means of an innovative approach to nozzle design. The technology will be experimentally demonstrated in a series of hot-fire tests during the proposed research program.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
Commercial and military small launch vehicle, DoD missile defense, Civilian space tourism.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
Small and nano-satellite launchers, Hypersonic flight test for propulsion and materials development, sub-orbital sounding rockets.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Atmospheric Propulsion
Fuels/Propellants
Launch Engine/Booster
Spacecraft Main Engine


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-2 T3.01-9785
PHASE-1 CONTRACT NUMBER:NNX12CG10P
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Technologies for Space Power and Propulsion
PROPOSAL TITLE: Materials and Structures Optimization / Process Development for the Mega-ROSA / ROSA Solar Array

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Deployable Space Systems, Inc.
75 Robin Hill, Building B2
Goleta, CA 93117-3108
(805) 693-1319

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
University of California, Santa Barbara
552 University Rd.
Santa Barbara, CA 93106-0002
(805) 893-8000

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Brian Spence
Brian.Spence@DeployableSpaceSystems.com
75 Robin Hill, Building B2
Goleta,  CA 93117-3108
(805) 722-8090

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 3
End: 5

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
Deployable Space Systems, Inc. (DSS), in collaboration with the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), Department of Mechanical Engineering, will focus the proposed NASA STTR Phase 2 program on the materials optimization, structures optimization, creep / relaxation phenomena characterization and analytical modeling, and manufacturing process optimization/development for the Mega-ROSA/ROSA solar array. The ROSA technology (termed for: Roll-Out Solar Array) is a new/innovative mission-enabling solar array system that offers maximum performance in all key metrics and unparalleled affordability for NASA's Space Science & Exploration missions. ROSA will enable NASA's emerging Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) Space Science & Exploration missions through its ultra-affordability, ultra-lightweight, ultra-compact stowage volume, high strength/stiffness, and its high voltage and high/low temperature operation capability within many environments. Multiple identified end-users provide strong commercial infusion paths for the ROSA solar array upon the successful execution of the proposed Phase 2 program technology advancements.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
Non-NASA space applications are comprised of practically all missions that require high-efficiency photovoltaic power production through deployment of an ultra-lightweight and highly-modular structural system. The technology is particularly suited for SEP missions that require game-changing performance in terms of affordability, ultra-lightweight, compact stowage volume, and superior structural performance. Applicable non-NASA space missions include: LEO surveillance, reconnaissance, communications and other critical payload/equipment satellites, LEO commercial mapping and critical payload/equipment satellites, MEO satellites & space-tugs, GEO commercial communications and critical payload/equipment satellites, and GEO communications and payload/equipment satellites. The proposed technology also has tremendous dual-use non-space commercial private-sector applicability including fixed-ground and deployable/retractable mobile-ground based systems.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
NASA space applications are comprised of practically all Exploration, Space Science, Earth Science, Planetary Surface, and other missions that require high-efficiency photovoltaic power production through deployment of an ultra-lightweight and highly-modular structural system. The technology is particularly suited for NASA's SEP missions and other missions that require game-changing performance in terms of affordability, ultra-lightweight, compact stowage volume, and superior structural performance. The technology is also well suited for applications requiring scalability/modularity, high deployed strength/stiffness, operability within high radiation environments, high voltage operation, and operation in LILT and HIHT environments.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Analytical Methods
Generation
Sources (Renewable, Nonrenewable)
Models & Simulations (see also Testing & Evaluation)
Project Management
Prototyping
Processing Methods
Composites
Nanomaterials
Polymers
Deployment
Structures
Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE; NDT)
Simulation & Modeling


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-2 T3.01-9950
PHASE-1 CONTRACT NUMBER:NNX12CG13P
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Technologies for Space Power and Propulsion
PROPOSAL TITLE: Canfield Joint - Vibration Isolation System for High Precision Pointing

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Balcones Technologies, LLC
10532 Grand Oak Circle
Austin, TX 78750-3851
(512) 918-1496

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
University of Texas - Center for Electromechanics
P.O. Box 7726
Austin, TX 78713-7726
(512) 471-6424

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Joseph Beno
j.beno@balconestech.com
10532 Grand Oak Circle
Austin,  TX 78750-3851
(512) 924-2241

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 3
End: 5

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
During our Phase I STTR effort, Balcones Technologies, LLC (BT) and The University of Texas at Austin Center for Electromechanics (CEM) successfully achieved all Phase I objectives and developed concept designs for controlled Canfield Joint Systems (CJS) for numerous applications that currently employ two-axis gimbal systems, including flywheel energy storage systems, integrated flywheel energy storage and attitude control systems, controlled moment gyros (CMG), and pointing systems for satellite-to-earth and satellite-to-satellite space optical communications (SOC). While all applications offered advantages for CJS compared to gimbal alternatives, a major result from our Phase I commercialization study was that the highest payoff Phase II demonstration for NASA and other commercial applications would focus on a CJS simultaneously sized for two applications: small satellite CMG and small satellite optical communications. Since the SOC application is more demanding and this emerging application offers more terrestrial and space applications, this application will serve as our demonstration target for Phase II. Additionally, since the SOC application has demanding vibration isolation requirements (especially for deep space communications) and since the BT-CEM team has very advanced expertise in this area, our Phase II demonstration will include development and integration of a vibration isolation system (VIS). Some key CJS-SOC features include: More than 30% improvement in pointing accuracy and precision compared to 2 axis gimbal systems; Integrated vibration isolation system to meet deep space optical communication systems; Also sized for small CMG application; Wide field of regard; Scalable to large flywheel applications; Maximum use of COTS components; Exploits team core capabilities in vibration isolation systems and high precision, high accuracy point systems.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
The CJS-VIS offers a competitively priced alternative to 2-axis gimbal systems that has higher precision, higher accuracy, and higher reliability. All the satellite related applications NASA desires this system for (SOC pointing, solar array pointing, thruster orientation, attitude control systems, etc.), have parallels in the commercial and military satellite sectors making these the highest value initial target markets. In addition to these space-based systems, the CJS-VIS offers an attractive alternative for the military in ground based weapons pointing and surveillance systems. Positioning of radio frequency antennae and telescope components for the military and industrial users is also a high value target market to exploit. The commercial market has several applications that are not as high value but higher volume in some cases. These will be harder to penetrate initially, due to existing products that are well entrenched, and include; the medical industry where similar systems are used in automated surgical and imaging system; industrial manufacturing where automated multi-axis control systems are used in machining, fabrication, and integration systems; industrial motion simulators; and automated imaging systems used for aerial mapping, facial recognition, movies, and even Google's "street view" images. BT's intent is to focus on the highest value applications first and then target these lower value applications as the system cost is reduced.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
Our integrated Canfield Joint System and Vibration Isolation System CJS-VIS) is an improved actuation system for pointing and attitude control meeting the needs of various NASA applications. Some of these applications include: Flywheel energy storage based spacecraft attitude control Optical communication vibration control (including deep space applications) Eliminating umbilical slip rings and/or anti-windup control features Advanced space communication and cross linked networking Space telescopes and imaging Thruster directional control Thru the unification of a CJS parallel actuator system and Balcones Technologies proven VIS technology, BT's solution provides not only full hemispherical pointing/attitude control capability, but vibration isolation as well. Advantages of our team's CJS-VIS concept include inherent system redundancy through its three actuators; elimination of "gimbal lock;" and kinematics that preclude rotation about the z-axis which eliminates the need for slip rings or imposed rotational limits. Thru the addition of a third high bandwidth, fine pointing mirror, the "layered" VIS control approach is scalable to 1 kHz. In doing so, it represents a single system suitable for fine pointing within 1 rad with less than 0.5 rad standard deviation from 0.01 Hz thru 1 kHz. The CJS-VIS system represents a minimal component, single source, competitive solution meeting current and future needs for a variety of NASA programs.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Antennas
Transmitters/Receivers
Attitude Determination & Control
Storage
Actuators & Motors
Machines/Mechanical Subsystems
Optical
Ranging/Tracking


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-2 T4.01-9792
PHASE-1 CONTRACT NUMBER:NNX12CG14P
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Innovative Sensors, Support Subsystems and Detectors for Small Satellite Applications
PROPOSAL TITLE: =Miniaurizable, High Performance, Fiber-Optic Gyroscopes for Small Satellites

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Intelligent Fiber Optic Systems Corporation
2363 Calle Del Mundo
Santa Clara, CA 95054-1008
(408) 565-9004

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
The University of Alabama
301 Sparkman Drive, VBRH
Huntsville, AL 35899-0001
(256) 824-2659

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Joey Costa
jc@ifos.com
2363 Calle Del Mundo
Santa Clara,  CA 95054-1008
(408) 565-9000

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 4
End: 5

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
This Phase 2 program builds on a successful Phase 1 effort that demonstrated practical engineering methods as well as continuing development paths to build smaller high performance gyro systems suitable for small satellite applications. This program will execute a logical follow-on endeavor by (a) using existing components that satisfy the specifications matrix, and (b) developing new components that are required to complete the task of fabricating small optical gyro heads. We have clearly defined tasks and realistic milestones with risk management embedded. Designed to fit within a 1U satellite chassis to adapt to the growing cube sat application space, a clear plan has been laid out to generate an IRU system that addresses deployment issues such as mass, harness routing, and 3-axis cluster versus split head configurations. The gyro design is a keen compromise between leveraging shorter wavelength subcomponents to improve performance naturally, smaller mechanical size to minimize thermal effects, and optoelectronics placement options for form factor flexibility. We recognize power management as the critical parameter for devices within small satellites, therefore an effort has been allocated to develop a solution concept for miniaturized and power-efficient control electronics to address the goal of <2W consumption, although its implementation is beyond the scope of this Phase 2 program.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
The commercial aviation sector and commercial companies involved in advanced aerospace projects are obvious candidates for this technology. The oil and gas industry needs to displace magnetometers to improve their measurement-while-drilling capabilities, which will lower the cost of energy resource exploration; thus a rugged, advanced miniature gyro system would offer a significant advantage. DOD programs involving advanced interceptors and space platforms can also benefit from a small, low cost gyro system that is radiation tolerant, immune to EMI, and capable of surviving harsh environments.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
Although the target application is a gyro system for small satellites, any NASA sounding rocket, research balloon, or space platform that needs a gyro system with improved SWaP-C will benefit from this technology development. Its small form factor lends itself to alternative applications such as planetary exploration bots and extravehicular platforms.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Air Transportation & Safety
Navigation & Guidance
Autonomous Control (see also Control & Monitoring)
Command & Control
Circuits (including ICs; for specific applications, see e.g., Communications, Networking & Signal Transport; Control & Monitoring, Sensors)
Inertial (see also Sensors)
Inertial


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-2 T4.01-9886
PHASE-1 CONTRACT NUMBER:NNX12CG15P
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Innovative Sensors, Support Subsystems and Detectors for Small Satellite Applications
PROPOSAL TITLE: Photonic Antenna Enhanced Middle Wave and Longwave Infrared Focal Plane Array with Low Noise and High Operating Temperature

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Applied NanoFemto Technologies, LLC
181 Stedmen Street, Unit #2
Lowell, MA 01851-5201
(978) 761-4293

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
University of Massachusetts - Lowell
600 Suffolk Street, Second Floor
Lowell, MA 01854-2827
(978) 934-2226

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Jarrod Vaillancourt
jarrod.vaillancourt@appliednanofemto.com
181 Stedmen Street, Unit #2
Lowell,  MA 01851-5201
(978) 430-7128

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 3
End: 6

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
Photodetectors and focal plane arrays (FPAs) covering the middle-wave and longwave infrared (MWIR/LWIR) are of great importance in numerous NASA applications, including earth remote sensing for carbon-based trace gases, Lidar mapping for earth resource locating, and environment and atmosphere monitoring. Existing MWIR/LWIR photodetectors have a low operating temperature of below 77K. The requirement for cryogenic cooling systems adds cost, weight and reliability issues, making it unsuitable for satellite remote sensing applications. This STTR project aims to develop a new plasmonic photonic antenna coupled MWIR/LWIR photodetector and FPA with significantly enhanced performance and a high operating temperature. In Phase I, we developed a preliminary plasmonic photonic antenna enhanced MWIR/LWIR photodetector and demonstrated significant enhancement in photodetectivity and operating temperature. Antenna directivity is also tested and agrees with the simulation. The phase I results not only demonstrated the feasibility of achieving high performance MWIR/LWIR photodetector using the proposed innovation, but also show its promising potentials for high operating temperature FPA development. Motivated by the successful feasibility demonstration and the promising potentials, in this STTR Phase II project, we will develop a prototype of the plasmonic photonic antenna enhanced MWIR/LWIR FPA with a high operating temperature and demonstrate its earth remote sensing capability.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
The high-performance ultra-compact MWIR/LWIR detector technology is particularly useful for many portable and standalone military and homeland security sensing and imaging applications such as night vision, missile early launch detection and remote chemical sensing and detection for biological/chemical warfare. Commercial markets include leak detection, chemical process control, remote chemical sensing for atmospheric pollution and drug monitoring, IR spectroscopy, and medical diagnoses. The technology developed herein would considerably accelerate the commercialization of IR camera technologies to meet the potential needs of the huge defense and commercial market.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
The proposed plasmonic photonic antenna enhanced MWIR/LWIR photodetector and FPA technology enables ultra-compact high performance MWIR/LWIR sensing with high photodetectivity and a high operating temperature. This technology avoids the bulky and heavy cryogenic cooling system and enables ultra-compact carbon-based trace gases (CH4, CO2, and CO) sensing with substantially reduced device size, weight and power consumption and improved system reliability for small satellite applications. It forms a key building block in IR cameras for numerous NASA's earth remote applications, including space telescope and high-sensitive space object imaging, high definition acquisition of radiation characteristics of Earth and its environments, monitoring of atmospheric variables such as temperature, winds, and trace constituents for understanding and predicting the earth's climate and potential hazards as well as topographical profiling of Earth for mineral identification and vegetation mapping.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Image Capture (Stills/Motion)
Thermal Imaging (see also Testing & Evaluation)
Nanomaterials
Detectors (see also Sensors)
Materials & Structures (including Optoelectronics)
Chemical/Environmental (see also Biological Health/Life Support)
Electromagnetic
Thermal
Infrared
Long
Multispectral/Hyperspectral


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-2 T5.01-9938
PHASE-1 CONTRACT NUMBER:NNX12CG20P
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Technologies for Planetary Compositional Analysis and Mapping
PROPOSAL TITLE: Lab-on-a-Robot Platform for In-Situ Planetary Compositional Analysis

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
HJ Science & Technology, Inc.
187 Saratoga Avenue
Santa Clara, CA 95050-6657
(408) 464-3873

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
University of Texas - San Antonio
One UTSA Circle
San Antonio, TX 78249-1644
(210) 458-8784

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Hong Jiao
hong_jiao@yahoo.com
187 Saratoga Avenue
Santa Clara,  CA 95050-6657
(408) 464-3873

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 6
End: 8

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
This joint STTR research effort between HJ Science & Technology and the University of Texas at San Antonio seeks to establish a highly integrated mobile "lab-on-a-chip" platform &#150; next generation "lab-on-a-robot" (LOAR) - capable of in-situ, high throughput, and simultaneous identification and characterization of universal classes of ions, molecules, and biomolecules for NASA in-situ planetary compositional analysis, and planetary and small body surface chemistry studies. The technology combines programmable microfluidic on-chip automation of sample processing, microchip capillary electrophoresis with contactless conductivity and optical detections, and integration with the next generation LOAR mobile platform in a miniaturized format. Such a mobile platform for the miniaturized instrument will lay the groundwork for future NASA in situ robotic missions. In Phase I, we have established the technical feasibility by demonstrating all key functionalities. This includes the separation and detection of selective ions that are relevant to the aqueous chemistry and reactivity of the Martian surface material with a novel microfab-less microfluidic device and the demonstration of the on-chip automated sample processing capability with a novel microvalve platform. The Phase II effort will include expanding and enhancing the performance capability of the novel microfab-less microfluidic device, integrating the on-chip automation technology to the microfluidic device and demonstrate the capability of the programmable on-chip automation of sample processing, and the design, construction, and test of a next generation LOAR prototype.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
The proposed "lab-on-a-robot" has broader commercial applications including monitoring environmental pollutants that are a potential concern for human health on Earth. The proposed technology is particularly relevant to in-situ analysis of environmental samples because currently the samples have to be physically acquired, transported, and then processed in the laboratory. Exposure of personnel to untested environments, sample degradation, contamination, and labor-intensive analytical protocols obviate the necessity for testing systems capable of performing on-site analysis and transmit the results autonomously. Compared with conventional laboratory based measurement techniques, the in-situ measurement capability of the portable and mobile platform offers important advantages including reduction in time and cost, real-time data for better and more timely decision making, and reduction in sample consumption.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
The proposed next generation "lab-on-a-robot" technology has great potential for NASA in-situ planetary and small body surface chemistry studies. In particular, the mobile platform in conjunction with the microchip capillary electrophoresis, contactless conductivity detection, and the on-chip automation of sample processing is ideally suited for simultaneous inorganic ion detection and analysis complementary to the "lab-on-a-chip" miniaturization of MECA's wet chemistry laboratory at JPL. The successful research effort will result in reduction in size, weight, power consumption, and cost of in-situ space probes. In addition, the proposed technology can also be used for on-chip biosensors, electrochemical sensors, on-chip sample separations, reactions, derivatizations, as well as for fluid positioning, mixing, metering, storage, and filtering systems.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Analytical Instruments (Solid, Liquid, Gas, Plasma, Energy; see also Sensors)
Analytical Methods
Robotics (see also Control & Monitoring; Sensors)
Biological Signature (i.e., Signs Of Life)
Chemical/Environmental (see also Biological Health/Life Support)


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-2 T6.01-9863
PHASE-1 CONTRACT NUMBER:NNX12CG21P
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Affordable and Sustainable Crew Support and Protection
PROPOSAL TITLE: A Self-Regulating Freezable Heat Exchanger for Spacecraft

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
TDA Research, Inc.
12345 West 52nd Avenue
Wheat Ridge, CO 80033-1916
(303) 940-2347

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
University of Colorado at Boulder
572 UCB
Boulder, CO 80309-0572
(303) 492-7110

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
James Nabity
nabity@tda.com
12345 West 52nd Avenue
Wheat Ridge,  CO 80212-1916
(303) 940-2313

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 4
End: 6

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
A spacecraft thermal control system must keep the vehicle, avionics and atmosphere (if crewed) within a defined temperature range. Since water is non-toxic and good for heat transport, it is typically used as the coolant that circulates within the crew cabin boundary. This loop then interfaces with another low freeze point fluid, such as ammonia, for transport of heat to a radiator where the temperatures can be considerably below the freezing point of water. The volumetric expansion during freeze usually prevents its use in external systems since freezing will damage the components. Yet, if the system can accommodate the forces generated by freezing, then selectively allowing parts of a heat exchanger to freeze can be used to passively increase the turn-down of the heat rejection from radiators. TDA Research, Inc. has been developing freezable water/ice phase change heat exchangers for several years that offer several advantages: they can eliminate the need for a separate heavy Freon or ammonia loop; use the buildup of ice to regulate the rate of heat transfer, and the endotherm of melting ice can absorb peak loads from the spacecraft to reduce the size and mass of the radiator. Therefore, TDA Research and the University of Colorado set out to demonstrate a lightweight and freeze tolerant water/ice heat exchanger to passively regulate the heat rejection rate from the water coolant loop of a manned spacecraft to its heat sink systems. The heat exchanger has no actively moving parts and is thus extremely reliable. In Phase I, we designed and built a self-regulating freezable heat exchanger that we put through 191 freeze/thaw cycles without damage and it has the capability to transfer the loads expected in crewed spacecraft. In Phase II, we will design, build and test a large-scale freeze tolerant water/ice heat exchanger that forms the heart of a thermal control system that we will deliver to NASA.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
The largest and nearest term commercial applications are the use of freeze tolerant tubing on earth. These earth-based applications include sprinkler systems and potable water supply in homes and commercial buildings. This market is potentially very large and virtually un-tapped because of the lack of a viable freeze tolerant tube. The Insurance Institute for Property Loss Reduction says frozen pipes have cost the insurance companies in the USA $4 billion in damage to insured homes and buildings over the past decade (i.e., about $400,000,000 per year). The savings in insurance rates alone could more than offset the cost to the user, who would have the added benefit of not having valuables destroyed by water damage and their lives disturbed during repairs of the water damage.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
A water coolant loop is usually part of the thermal control system for manned spacecraft. The water loop then interfaces with a Freon or ammonia loop to reject heat to the heat sink systems. A simpler approach would be to design the water coolant heat exchangers to be freeze tolerant and utilize the phase change of water to ice as part of the thermal control system. This would eliminate the need for a second heavier fluid loop using Freon or ammonia (heavier because these fluids are poorer heat transfer media). Further, a water/ice heat exchanger can use the buildup of ice to self-regulate heat transport from the spacecraft to space. This approach to thermal control will result in a safer and more reliable system. In spacesuits, a freeze tolerant heat exchanger/radiator system will dramatically reduce (by roughly 75%) the single largest consumable during EVA. A spacesuit radiator can replace the PLSS covering with very little net increase in weight and yet will cut the amount of water needed to cool the astronaut during an EVA by up to 6 lbs. This will represent a significant cost savings to future missions and especially in Lunar and Mars EVA missions where the reduction in water loss is not merely nice, it is essential.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Models & Simulations (see also Testing & Evaluation)
Lifetime Testing
Heat Exchange
Passive Systems


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-2 T6.02-9880
PHASE-1 CONTRACT NUMBER:NNX12CG24P
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Active Debris Removal Technologies
PROPOSAL TITLE: Enabling Large-body Active Debris Removal

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
VectorNav Technologies, LLC
903 North Bowser Road, Suite 200
Richardson, TX 75081-2897
(512) 772-3615

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Texas Engineering Experiment Station / Texas A&M University
3141 TAMU
College Station, TX 77845-3141
(979) 845-7541

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
John Junkins
junkins@tamu.edu
3141 TAMU
College Station,  TX 77845-3141
(979) 845-3912

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 4
End: 5

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
Research suggests that: (1) orbital debris has reached the point that, even with no future launches, collisions among large-body debris will lead to unstable growth in debris, and (2) removing as few as five large objects each year can stabilize debris growth. For large-body active debris removal (LB-ADR), new technologies are required to safely capture the target debris. The interactions of these complex electromechanical systems (eg. imaging systems, robotic arms and grippers) and controllers pose challenges best addressed by hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) testing. Given the risks inherent in non-cooperative spacecraft proximity operations and the firm requirement that ADR missions do not themselves produce additional debris, realistic ground-based testing is required for risk reduction. Our approach to HWIL contains two major advancements: (1) novel robotic technologies that overcome the limitations of existing test facilities, and (2) carefully designed spacecraft models capable of thoroughly evaluating every aspect of a capture system. The LASR Lab was built around HOMER, an omnidirectional robot designed and built specifically to emulate the 6-DOF relative-motion trajectories of spacecraft. The Phase I effort validated HOMER's capabilities and reduced to hardware the Dynamic Payload Pendulum (DPP), an actively controlled pendulum that provides the equivalent of a 5-DOF air-bearing. Together, they permit large-scale motion with accurate contact dynamics. Having identified rocket boosters as ideal LB-ADR targets, we investigated the model features necessary for realistic testing of grappling and sensing systems and for accurate dynamic response on the DPP. Leveraging the developments of Phase I and concurrent work on autonomous, vision-based navigation systems at the LASR Lab, we propose to simultaneously advance the TRL of the ground-test facility and the nav systems by performing an end-to-end simulation of an approach and capture of multiple rocket bodies.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
Realistic ground-based testing of spacecraft proximity operations provides significant risk reduction for any active debris removal mission. The LASR Lab is uniquely capable of providing full 6-DOF relative motion capabilities at low cost. The testing and validation of the high-accuracy 6-DOF feedback tracking on HOMER, combined with the pendulum-based equivalent of a 5-DOF air bearing, will certify LASR Lab as a world-class test facility - a true dynamics version of a wind tunnel. VectorNav plans to serve as a commercial partner to LASR Lab, providing design of experiments support whenever customers contract with the LASR Lab for testing. The details gleaned from the Mock Target Trade Study of Phase I and the orbit debris capture experiment of Phase II places VectorNav in a prime position to design realistic experiments for a wide variety of customers at LASR Lab and other simulation facilities.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
The advanced capabilities of the LASR Lab at Texas A&M to provide high-fidelity, hardware-in-the-loop testing is broadly applicable to any spacecraft proximity operations mission, as is the know-how generated by the development of the high-fidelity rocket body models and subsequent orbit debris capture experiments by VectorNav. VectorNav and the LASR Lab will be able to provide extensive support and testing facilities for a wide range of customers, both commercial and governmental. Missions supported include among others: GEO refueling, on-orbit servicing, and fractionated spacecraft.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Relative Navigation (Interception, Docking, Formation Flying; see also Control & Monitoring; Planetary Navigation, Tracking, & Telemetry)
Algorithms/Control Software & Systems (see also Autonomous Systems)
Inertial
Optical/Photonic (see also Photonics)
Positioning (Attitude Determination, Location X-Y-Z)
Hardware-in-the-Loop Testing
Simulation & Modeling


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-2 T7.03-9842
PHASE-1 CONTRACT NUMBER:NNX12CG27P
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Flexible Polymer Foams Systems for Fireproofing and Energy Absorption
PROPOSAL TITLE: New Flexible FR Polyurethane Foams for Energy Absorption Applications

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Gordon Nelson and Associates
2283 Hamlet Drive
Melbourne, FL 32934-7609
(321) 255-1163

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Florida Institute of Technology
150 West University Boulevard
Melbourne, FL 32901-6975
(321) 674-7239

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Feng Yang
fyang@fit.edu
150 W. University Blvd
Melbourne,  FL 32901-6975
(321) 674-7290

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 5
End: 7

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
Project involves development of new flexible FR polyurethane (PU)insulation foams through a non-toxic environmentally friendly composite approach. Foams have bound-in polymeric phosphonate FRs, with added synergists and smoke suppressants. Such foams will not leach FR. Foams have fine cell structure and excellent flexible foam properties. Cone performance of the identified foam family (368 peak rate of heat release versus 1670 control - 78% reduction in PHRR) clearly surpasses that of standard commercial flexible PU foams: 502 to 913 for CAL 133 compliant foams, 953 for BS5852 compliant foam, and 1154 for CAL 117 compliant PU foam. Project foams easily comply with NASA 6001 open flame testing. Foams with under 3.0 pcf are available. Procedures for incorporation of significant Aerogel concentrations (5 pbw to 15 pbw), useful for cryogenic and low temperature insulation, have been identified and tested. Results are based on over 200 foams made in small scale and 100 foams prepared as 5L molded foams. Phase II of Project involves scale-up of foams in the foam family, preparation of intermediate scale samples capable of more detailed application testing, performing such testing (Eg. cryogenic insulation testing), and sampling of foams to potential customers identified by the project expert Commercialization Panel. In working with foam vendors on intermediate scale sample preparation, potential commercial partners will be identified and assessed. Large scale runs are also planned. Potential commercial partners will have the opportunity to gain experience with the foams in intermediate scale sample preparation. Selected partners will have the opportunity to share their experience with the Commercialization Panel to focus on highest value applications and needed performance. Such interaction will lead to partnering, licensing and joint venture discussions.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
High performance applications identified and prioritized by expert Commercialization Panel, applications which require FR properties, performance, and can bear value pricing: Packaging foam (US Navy)(wide range of specific applications) Radio frequency absorber (electronic industry and at airports) Industrial insulation (where flexibility needed) Acoustic insulation for recording studios/night clubs (exposed/no coating) Industrial insulation (where flexibility needed) Appliance insulation Prison mattresses Naval mattresses CAL 133 furniture (Kevlar cover/FR foam) Cruise boats/maritime industry Automotive headliners Children's mattresses Intra- and inter-city train seating (FRA rules) Children's toys Automotive firewalls Aircraft seating BS 5852 Furniture All of above also in Canadian, Asian, and European markets

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
Cost effective Flexible Polyurethane foams for: Cryogenic insulation Fireproofing Energy absorption Other aerospace applications

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Aerogels
Composites
Polymers
Smart/Multifunctional Materials


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-2 T8.03-9888
PHASE-1 CONTRACT NUMBER:NNX12CG32P
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Autonomous Navigation in GNSS-Denied Environments
PROPOSAL TITLE: Adaptive bio-inspired navigation for planetary exploration

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Neurala, LLC
846 East 3rd Street
Boston, MA 02217-2359
(510) 205-8091

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Trustees of Boston University
881 Commonwealth Avenue
Boston, MA 02215-1300
(617) 353-4365

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Anatoly Gorshechnikov
anatoli@bu.edu
677 Beacon St
Boston,  MA 02215-1300
(617) 353-8771

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 4
End: 5

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
Exploration of planetary environments with current robotic technologies relies on human control and power-hungry active sensors to perform even the most elementary low-level functions. Ideally, a robot would be able to autonomously explore novel environments, memorize locations of obstacles or objects, learn about objects, build and update an environment map, and return to a safe location. All of these tasks constitute typical activities efficiently performed by animals on a daily basis. The primary objective of the proposed research is to develop a biologically-inspired neuromorphic application that will translate the above-mentioned functionalities into an autonomous robot or unmanned aerial system (UAS). The Phase I effort implemented a neuromorphic system capable of exploring an unknown environment, avoiding obstacles, and returning to base for refuel/recharge without the use of a Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). This system was successfully tested in a Mars-like virtual environment and a simple robot. Leveraging Phase I results, the Phase II effort will develop visual processing based on passive sensors in order to find, identify, localize and interact with objects and use this information to enhance navigation capabilities. Neurala's neuromorphic application will also allow for human guidance through an intuitive user interface. Low-power hardware will be evaluated to facilitate real-time performance in robots and unmanned platforms.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
Neurala's neuromorphic application has wide-ranging utility in robotics. It makes use of passive sensors, does not require GNSS for navigation, and incorporates training without explicit programming which taken together will reduce development costs and time while simultaneously increasing the robustness of existing robotic systems. The proposed Phase II innovation brings relevance and added benefit to the following market sectors: Defense &#150; Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS), surveillance, patrol, rescue, demining; Business &#150; telepresence; Home &#150; cleaning; Healthcare &#150; remote diagnosis, assistive living; and Agriculture &#150; autonomous seeding, crop assessment, wildlife conservation. Neurala will initially focus on a new and emerging teleoperated robots (or telepresence) market as well as the more mature and established UAS sectors. Neurala's technology enables telepresence robots, such as iRobot's RP-VITA, to learn an internal map of rooms, obstacles, and objects of interest. Neurala's solution will also provide collision- and GNSS-free navigation and control-less travel for UAS systems.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
The technology will have a transformative impact on space exploration, and is directly relevant in addressing the key attributes of autonomy to support NASA missions, stated in the OCT roadmap for Robotics, Tele-Robotics and Autonomous Systems (TA04) as, "the ability for complex decision making, including autonomous mission execution and planning, the ability to self-adapt as the environment in which the system is operating changes, and the ability to understand system state and react accordingly." This work also addresses two space technology grand challenges which aim to enable transformational space exploration and scientific discovery: all access mobility and surviving extreme space environments as well as one grand challenge, telepresence in space, aimed at expanding human presence in space. NASA will be able to use this technology for autonomous exploration and mapping as well as in hostile environments in which telepresence and autonomous control will be employed.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Air Transportation & Safety
Navigation & Guidance
Relative Navigation (Interception, Docking, Formation Flying; see also Control & Monitoring; Planetary Navigation, Tracking, & Telemetry)
Autonomous Control (see also Control & Monitoring)
Intelligence
Man-Machine Interaction
Perception/Vision
Robotics (see also Control & Monitoring; Sensors)
Algorithms/Control Software & Systems (see also Autonomous Systems)
Command & Control
Teleoperation
Models & Simulations (see also Testing & Evaluation)
Prototyping
Software Tools (Analysis, Design)
Display
Image Analysis
Image Capture (Stills/Motion)
Image Processing
Data Acquisition (see also Sensors)
Data Fusion
Data Input/Output Devices (Displays, Storage)
Data Modeling (see also Testing & Evaluation)
Data Processing
Vehicles (see also Autonomous Systems)
Optical
Telemetry (see also Control & Monitoring)
Positioning (Attitude Determination, Location X-Y-Z)
Development Environments
Operating Systems
Hardware-in-the-Loop Testing
Simulation & Modeling


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-2 T9.01-9977
PHASE-1 CONTRACT NUMBER:NNX12CG36P
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Technologies for Human and Robotic Space Exploration Propulsion Design and Manufacturing
PROPOSAL TITLE: Closed-Loop Control of the Thermal Stir Welding Process to Enable Rapid Process / Part Qualification

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Keystone Synergistic Enterprises, Inc.
664 NW Enterprise Drive, Suite 118
Port Saint Lucie, FL 34986-2250
(772) 343-7544

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Mississippi State University
449 Hardy Road 133 Etheredge Hall P.O. Box 6156
Mississippi State, MS 39762-0001
(662) 325-7396

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Bryant Walker
bryanthwalk@aol.com
664 NW Enterprise Dr., Suite 118
Port Saint Lucie,  FL 34953-2250
(772) 343-7544

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 4
End: 5

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) provides advancement over the more conventional Friction Stir Welding (C-FSW) process because it separates the primary processes variables thereby allowing independent control of metal stirring and forging from the stir zone temperature. However, the feedback for precise control of the stir zone temperature, and hence the process parameters to sustain that temperature within a narrow range, does not currently exist on the TSW machine at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). At present, the current state of the art for the selection of process parameters for both TSWing and C-FSWing parameters is highly empirical and by nature is based on phenomenological knowledge. In response to this need, Keystone is proposing this Phase II STTR project to demonstrate the feasibility of closed-loop control of the TSW process and to enable the establishment of a analytically derived processing map to accelerate process understanding and selection of parameters for a given material and pin tool design. The close-loop control system will enable sustainment of a steady-state temperature at the stir rod as a function of spindle RPM and the travel velocity for a given z-axis loading and stir rod design. Use of this theoretically derived processing map will provide guidance in the optimization of the process parameter domain for solid-state welding of a given material. This capability will in turn enable rapid process qualification of the TSW process and components produced by the process.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
The proposed technology will enable the creation of processing maps to characterize the solid-state joining of metals by thermal stir welding. The closed-loop temperature control system (applicable to other types of stir welding) will allow higher fidelity, stir welding of alloys of interest to NASA for manufacturing space craft and heavy lift vehicles. The analytical simulation of the stir welding process will enable more rapid and less costly formation of processing maps of a given material. The control system and analytical simulation combined will enable formation of a processing map for Haynes 230 (the alloy of choice by NASA for the J2X nozzle extension) and establishment of a rapid process qualification methodology for thermal stir welded components. Keystone also recently demonstrated over 60-feet of solid-state titanium welds for evaluations and for build of a partial section of a littoral ship structure built by Litton Industries. With the success of this demonstration ONR is considering extension of the project to include further mechanical/structural testing of the hull and superstructure section. Is it this type of foundational work, enabled by the NASA TSW process, Keystone anticipates emergence into commercial ship building applications for the TSW process.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
The advancement of stir welding technologies has application well beyond NASA applications. It is envisioned this technology will become important to the Navy for ship building applications, as well as to the larger commercial ship building industry for construction of ship hulls and superstructure. The process will also be useful to fabrication of large tankage and piping for the chemical processing and transportation industry. Potential NASA applications for the TSW technologies we propose developing and implementing would be solid and liquid rocket motor casing, liquid rocket nozzle extensions, and other high temperature components; more specifically, a nozzle skirt extension for the J2X engine and 4130 steel external casing for the NASA sounding rocket.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Processing Methods
Joining (Adhesion, Welding)
Metallics
Structures
Launch Engine/Booster
Spacecraft Main Engine


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-2 T10.02-9782
PHASE-1 CONTRACT NUMBER:NNX12CG38P
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Energy Conservation and Sustainability
PROPOSAL TITLE: Hydrogen-Based Energy Conservation System

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Sustainable Innovations, LLC
160 Oak Street
Glastonbury, CT 06033-2336
(860) 652-9690

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
The University of Connecticut
438 Whitney Road Ext. Unit 1133
Storrs, CT 06033-9018
(860) 486-3622

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Joshua Preston
joshua.preston@sustainableinnov.com
160 Oak Street, Unit 412
Glastonbury,  CT 06033-2336
(860) 560-3280

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 3
End: 5

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
Sustainable Innovations is developing a technology for efficient separation and compression of hydrogen gas. The electrochemical hydrogen separator and compressor can actively remove hydrogen from a mixture and compress it to high pressure for storage or use. In applications where helium is used as a purge gas prior to the use of liquid hydrogen or use of cold hydrogen from cryogenic storage boil-off, the compressor system is suitable for separation of the hydrogen from the helium in the resulting mixed stream. This technology allows a significant portion of either gas to be recycled and conserved. In applications requiring recycling of helium where abundant hydrogen is present, it is practical to utilize the energy content of a portion of the hydrogen to power the electrochemical separation of hydrogen from the helium. This novel application leverages hydrogen that was destined for flaring and oxidizes it electrochemically to power separation of hydrogen from helium, thus allowing recovery of the helium and delivering net power.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
The underlying technology directly benefits many commercial applications. These include: - Simple, high-pressure capable hydrogen compressors - Cryogenic hydrogen boil-off recovery - Efficient separation of hydrogen from helium at natural gas well sites - Separation and compression of hydrogen in various production processes, such as from steam methane reforming and stationary power fuel cells. - Creation of a large scale electrochemical cell architecture to support fuel cell, water electrolysis, regenerative fuel cell, and flow battery applications.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
The underlying technology is directly applicable to several important NASA applications. These include: - Recycling of hydrogen and helium used in rocket testing applications. - Recycling/compression of hydrogen used in space exploration applications - Generation of high pressure hydrogen for conducting mechanical work. - Creation of a large-scale electrochemical architecture for power and gas generation applications including electrolysis of water, fuel cells, and energy storage.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Tools/EVA Tools
Remediation/Purification
Conversion
Distribution/Management
Generation
Sources (Renewable, Nonrenewable)
Storage
Fluids
Pressure & Vacuum Systems
Fuels/Propellants
Spacecraft Main Engine
Lifetime Testing


PROPOSAL NUMBER:11-2 T10.02-9974
PHASE-1 CONTRACT NUMBER:NNX12CG40P
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Energy Conservation and Sustainability
PROPOSAL TITLE: Energy Efficient LED Spectrally Matched Smart Lighting

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN: (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Innovative Imaging and Research Corporation
Building 1103, Suite 140C
Stennis Space Center, MS 39529-0001
(228) 688-2452

RESEARCH INSTITUTION: (RI Name, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
University of Houston Clear Lake
2700 Bay Area Boulevard
Houston, TX 77058-1002
(281) 283-2138

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER: (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/ZIP, Phone)
Robert Ryan
rryan@i2rcorp.com
Building 1103, Suite 140C
Stennis Space Center,  MS 39259-0001
(228) 688-2276

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 4
End: 7

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
Innovative Imaging and Research and the University of Houston Clear Lake have teamed to develop a widely extensible, affordable, energy efficient, smart lighting device known as Lambda-Net. Smart building technologies, such as Lambda-Net, are becoming critical to energy savings and sustainability for terrestrial applications and space-based habitats. Our device incorporates a smart-mobile device or other comparable sized integrated computing/sensing device into each LED fixture. Smart-mobile devices are ideally suited to perform energy saving lighting control as they contain inexpensive, mass produced, highly integrated imaging, computing and communication technologies. The low cost digital cameras within these packages become highly capable imaging photosensors using calibration techniques developed for NASA satellites and the commercial remote sensing industry. Novel algorithms utilize lighting information measured by the photosensors to individually tailor the intensity and spectral content of the light generated from each LED fixture within the lighting system to reduce energy usage, increase lighting efficacy and improve circadian rhythm influenced activities such as sleeping and concentration. Advanced spatially distributed occupancy sensing and lighting control further reduces energy usage. Integrating sensing and computing into each light fixture also provides the infrastructure to create a robust sensor network. Network communication is achieved through Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and other communication means, such as the power lines that provide electricity to each fixture. This resulting sensor network enables a wide range of terrestrial and space-based applications including monitoring: building/habitat temperature, humidity and air quality; occupant health and safety; building/habitat space utilization and astronaut activity including deep space adaptation in addition to providing high quality spatially selectable, spectrally programmable illumination.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
The Lambda-Net technology provides government and commercial entities energy efficient, high quality lighting within a low cost wireless sensor network. We believe our technology will have significant appeal within the education sector. Throughout the country more and more school districts are incorporating "green school" concepts. The Green Schools Initiative incorporates a 4-pillared framework that includes energy efficiency and using resources sustainably. We plan to engage with these programs and initiatives to showcase our unique technology, which is highly applicable to educational environments. Our smart light technology not only reduces the overall amount of energy consumed through efficient light harvesting- automatically adjusting the amount of light produced in response to available sunlight, but is also capable of tailoring the spectrum of the light it produces to affect natural biorhythms, which has been shown to improve academic attention. Since it provides spectrally selectable illumination, it can also be marketed to researches performing circadian rhythm studies. Other potential markets include libraries, museums and other public places that would benefit from enhancement of security and fire protection monitoring enabled through the Lambda-Net wireless sensor network.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA APPLICATION(S) (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
The Lambda-Net technology provides NASA energy efficient, high quality space habitat lighting that can be spectrally tuned to help mitigate astronaut sleep disorders and circadian rhythm induced responses. The wireless sensor network inherent in the design also provides NASA a means by which they can monitor environmental parameters, space utilization and astronaut activity including deep space adaptation within space habitats. The technology can also help NASA meet government mandates that require Federal agencies to significantly reduce their building energy use. United States Executive Order 13423, issued in January 2007, mandates that federal buildings reduce their energy use by 3 percent per year, so that they attain a 30 percent reduction in energy use by the year 2015. In general these will be NASA office and laboratory environments with partial solar illumination, that take advantage of the daylight harvesting feature of our smart light concept, and locations within NASA facilities that are intermittently populated such as stairwells and bathrooms, that take advantage of the occupancy sensing technology within our smart light concept. We also anticipate large payoff for NASA adopting this technology in areas that would benefit from security and fire protection monitoring, additional features that our Lambda-Net smart light system provides.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Fire Protection
Ad-Hoc Networks (see also Sensors)
Algorithms/Control Software & Systems (see also Autonomous Systems)
Circuits (including ICs; for specific applications, see e.g., Communications, Networking & Signal Transport; Control & Monitoring, Sensors)
3D Imaging
Image Analysis
Image Processing
Data Acquisition (see also Sensors)
Data Processing
Detectors (see also Sensors)
Radiometric
Visible