NASA 1996 SBIR Phase I


PROPOSAL NUMBER : 96-1 01.11-6551

PROJECT TITLE : Anti Icing System Using Engine Waste Heat

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)

Ice formation on aircraft flight surfaces such as wing leading edges and engine cowls during flight is extremely hazardous. There is a method for deicing in development that involves breaking the ice from these surfaces. Mechanical de-icing is energy efficient, but dislodged chunks of ice can damage engine components. A safer approach is to anti ice which involves heating of critical surfaces to prevent ice from forming, but this exacts a penalty in engine power and thrust. Loop Heat Pipes can provide passive anti-icing using engine waste heat. The only impact on engine performance is due to the heating of inlet air. Since waste heat is extracted from the air oil cooler (AOC), this component can be made smaller with a net savings on specific fuel consumption.

Already accomplished work has established the technical suitability of the Loop Heat Pipe for the application and quantified the performance advantage versus bleed air. Depending on the engine the use of waste heat can effect a 5-6% increase in available shaft horsepower and a 1-5% reduction in specific fuel consumption. In a NASA debriefing, a recent anti icing proposal was criticized because, AIt does not address the real technology issues...for inflight aircraft ice protection. ...requires early integration work.... It neglects issues of system weight and cost.@ The proposed program will resolve these issues for use of a Loop Heat Pipe (LHP)Anti Icing system aboard the Teledyne Ryan Tier II Plus high altitude endurance UAV (the Global Hawk). Two prototype aircraft are presently under construction. Phase I will examine the integration of LHP anti icing for the engine cowl on the prototype aircraft and produce a preliminary design at a level that will permit the evaluation of the system=s mass and cost efficiency versus other options. Phase II will produce an LHP anti icing system integrated into the engine cowl and test it in the NASA LeRC Icing Chamber.

POTENTIAL COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS
The ability to perform anti icing using waste heat instead of bleed air or electrical power, would be a tremendous benefit for both military and commercial aircraft. The economic and safety incentives resulting from a 5% increase in available engine thrust and a 1-5% improvement in specific fuel consumption will lead to a very large world market.
NAME AND ADDRESS OF PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR
Thermacore, Inc.,
780 Eden Road,
Lancaster, PA, 17601
NAME AND ADDRESS OF OFFEROR
Thermacore, Inc.,
780 Eden Road,
Lancaster, PA, 17601