NASA SBIR 2012 Solicitation

FORM B - PROPOSAL SUMMARY


PROPOSAL NUMBER: 12-1 A3.04-8942
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Aerodynamic Efficiency - Drag Reduction Technology
PROPOSAL TITLE: Silicon Carbide Semiconductor Surface Dielectric Barrier Discharge (SSDBD) Device for Turbulent Skin Friction Drag Reduction and Flow Control

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
Spectral Energies, LLC
5100 Springfield Street, Suite 301
Dayton, OH 45431 - 1262
(937) 266-9570

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
Sivaram Gogineni
sgogineni@spectralenergies.com
5100 Springfield Street, Suite 301
Dayton, OH 45431 - 1262
(937) 266-9570

CORPORATE/BUSINESS OFFICIAL (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
Sivaram Gogineni
sgogineni@spectralenergies.com
5100 Springfield Street, Suite 301
Dayton, OH 45431 - 1262
(937) 266-9570

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 2
End: 4

Technology Available (TAV) Subtopics
Aerodynamic Efficiency - Drag Reduction Technology is a Technology Available (TAV) subtopic that includes NASA Intellectual Property (IP). Do you plan to use the NASA IP under the award?
No

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (Limit 2000 characters, approximately 200 words)
The proposed research effort explores the use of a nanosecond pulse driven offset semiconducting surface dielectric barrier discharge (SSDBD) device for the control of high speed, near surface air flows and the reduction of skin friction drag. With the nanosecond discharge, very high field strengths are applied and then the field is turned off before glow-to-filamentary transition occurs. The semiconducting surface array suppresses the backward breakdown that has previously been shown to produce a cancelling backward jet leading to very little thrust for conventional nanosecond driven devices. The embedded semiconductors achieve this by conducting the backward current through the surface and thus eliminating the backward breakdown. This allows all the momentum produced in the forward direction to be delivered to the surrounding boundary layer flow field. Conventional sinusoidal driven Surface DBD's are capable of generating surface jets with velocities up to ~10 meter per second, limited by glow-to-filamentary transition of the discharge. The proposed SBIR work will explore the possibility of increasing the surface jet velocity by more than a factor of five. In addition, the SSDBD can be driven at a very high repetition rate, producing high repetition sequential surface jets and total thrust that are expected to be orders of magnitude higher than possible with conventional sinusoidal DBD configurations. These surface jets are expected to provide new methods for the control of boundary layer interactions including separation, transition to turbulence, and drag through the introduction of time varying momentum at selected locations close to the surface.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (Limit 1500 characters, approximately 150 words)
Potential flow control applications of interest to NASA, based on the delay or early initiation of laminar-to-turbulent transition by manipulating near wall instability mechanisms, includes steering moments, reduced viscous drag, enhanced mixing, and reduced heat transfer. The SSDBD device may also be useful for reducing viscous drag, heat transfer, and fatigue caused by cyclic loading due to airframe vibration. These specific applications are achievable by controlling shock-induced boundary layer separation encountered in compression ramp geometries.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (Limit 1500 characters, approximately 150 words)
The potential flow control capabilities of the nanosecond pulse driven, offset semiconducting surface dielectric barrier discharge (SSDBD) device are not limited to NASA flight vehicles. In particular, the manipulation and control of subsonic instabilities such as stationary crossflow vortices by discrete roughness elements in the form of plasma bumps could potentially delay laminar-to-turbulent transition, greatly reducing viscous drag. In addition, the use of this device should be able to control boundary layer separation which would reduce viscous drag, and fatigue caused by cyclic loading due to airframe vibration.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING (NASA's technology taxonomy has been developed by the SBIR-STTR program to disseminate awareness of proposed and awarded R/R&D in the agency. It is a listing of over 100 technologies, sorted into broad categories, of interest to NASA.)
Actuators & Motors
Aerodynamics
Atmospheric Propulsion
Characterization
Condition Monitoring (see also Sensors)
Image Analysis
Image Processing
Materials (Insulator, Semiconductor, Substrate)
Space Transportation & Safety
Spacecraft Design, Construction, Testing, & Performance (see also Engineering; Testing & Evaluation)
Thermal


Form Generated on 03-28-13 15:21