NASA SBIR 2011 Solicitation

FORM B - PROPOSAL SUMMARY


PROPOSAL NUMBER: 11-1 X7.02-9839
SUBTOPIC TITLE: Human-Robotic Systems - Mobility Subsystems
PROPOSAL TITLE: Adaptive Bioassistive and Telerobotic Devices for Human-Robotic Systems

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN (Firm Name, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
CU Aerospace, LLC
301 N. Neil St. - Suite 400
Champaign, IL 61820 - 3169
(217) 239-1703

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER (Name, E-mail, Mail Address, City/State/Zip, Phone)
David Carroll
carroll@cuaerospace.com
301 N. Neil St. - Suite 400
Champaign, IL 61820 - 3169
(217) 239-1703

Estimated Technology Readiness Level (TRL) at beginning and end of contract:
Begin: 3
End: 4

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (Limit 2000 characters, approximately 200 words)
CU Aerospace and team partner, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, propose to perform innovative research and development that targets the design and control of adaptive bioassistive and telerobotic devices - ABATRODs - that augment normal musculoskeletal function in rapidly changing and disruptive environments while providing predictable response. ABATRODs accommodate fast changes in environment while actively shaping the response to muscle actuation to that anticipated by the operator, allowing the operator to maintain focus on task objectives. The ABATROD architecture uses principles of L1 adaptive control to decouple the task of adaptation and environmental uncertainty from the operator perceived response, thereby enabling the design of a range of apparently nonintrusive augmenting and telerobotic device technologies. The L1 paradigm significantly widens the domain of safe operation within which operator-induced instability can be eliminated without tuning. This effort makes innovative contributions to NASA-relevant space exploration tasks: (i) sustained and accurate manipulation of physical control interfaces on machinery and vehicles by an operator on a shaking space vehicle or rover, (ii) the stable and coordinated handling of scientific or photographic hardware by an astronaut during ambulation across uneven terrain, and (iii) the precise and reliable control of telerobotic devices for robotic-EVAs in unpredictable conditions.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (Limit 1500 characters, approximately 150 words)
This effort makes innovative contributions to NASA-relevant space exploration tasks: (i) sustained and accurate manipulation of physical control interfaces on machinery and vehicles by an operator on a shaking space vehicle or rover, (ii) the stable and coordinated handling of scientific or photographic hardware by an astronaut during ambulation across uneven terrain, and (iii) the precise and reliable control of telerobotic devices for robotic-EVAs in unpredictable conditions. Another possible NASA application could be telerobotic surgery from a surgeon on the Earth to an astronaut in space.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (Limit 1500 characters, approximately 150 words)
Ensuring predictable response in the presence of unexpected failures is critical to the safety of operation of these bioassistive telerobotic devices and to reducing risk to human lives. Beyond the NASA space exploration possibilities for ABATRODs, these devices have clear military (moving soldiers and vehicles on uneven terrain) and medical applications involving a broad range of possibilities and high commercial impact. Bioassistive device technology may be used to augment normal function, to prevent injury to function, and/or to rehabilitate injured function. Exoskeletal devices for augmenting normal function enable increased load-carrying capabilities and sustain robust gait characteristics in adverse terrain. In telerobotic applications, normal function is augmented through the transformation of human motor activity to different scales of motion and force. Further, exoskeletal devices for preventing injury to function alleviate the occurrence of repetitive stress disorders through compensatory action, enable heavy lifts, and support added loads, say a back pack on a child's back to prevent developmental damage. Finally, exoskeletal devices may be used for rehabilitating injured function to assist locomotion-impaired or otherwise disabled individuals, prevent circulatory problems in extremities, and enable the resumption of every-day activities involving sustained balance and support. Telesurgical applications offer additional opportunities for the ABATROD concept.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING (NASA's technology taxonomy has been developed by the SBIR-STTR program to disseminate awareness of proposed and awarded R/R&D in the agency. It is a listing of over 100 technologies, sorted into broad categories, of interest to NASA.)
Man-Machine Interaction
Robotics (see also Control & Monitoring; Sensors)
Teleoperation


Form Generated on 11-22-11 13:43