NASA STTR 2005 Solicitation

FORM B - PROPOSAL SUMMARY


PROPOSAL NUMBER:05 T5.02-9861
RESEARCH SUBTOPIC TITLE:Robotics and Virtual Digital Human Technologies
PROPOSAL TITLE:Advanced 3D Human Simulation Components with Thermal/Haptic Feedback and Tissue Deformation

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN (SBC): RESEARCH INSTITUTION (RI):
NAME: HPN Software Consultant, Inc. NAME:Stanford University School of Medicine
ADDRESS:18519 Egret Bay, Suite 1509 ADDRESS:701A Welch Road, Suite 1128
CITY:Houston CITY:Palo Alto
STATE/ZIP:TX  77058-3353 STATE/ZIP:CA  94304-0000
PHONE: (281) 333-3846 PHONE: (650) 498-6978

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER (Name,Email)
Mr. Lac  V. Nguyen
lac.nguyen1@jsc.nasa.gov

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
In integrating the following three significant components for its research/research and development (R/R&D) effort, the power of this candidate Phase I project will be demonstrated through the Collaborative Virtual Environment Simulation Tool (CVEST):

1. Software Application Development Toolkit
2. Physiological Hardware Interface
3. Technology Integration Manager

The multi-faceted CVEST development environment operates as a plug-and-play interface to various software and hardware products specializing in virtual reality-based simulation development. The final Phase I demonstration will feature the muscular mass/tissue deformation within a digital virtual human interface (DVH) to show performance data (physiological, biomechanical, etc).

This STTR Phase I candidate project will concentrate on some new physiological hardware/haptic devices to produce tactile feedback to the user. These range from gross or large object reporting to more fine-grain/granular tactile sensing to thermal sensing devices. In addition, a COTS-based Global Position System (GPS) will be analyzed as wireless tracking source for the user.

For NASA and commercial domains, this Phase I simulation facility, with its physiological/biomechanical functionality, could be implemented in software and integrated to enable realistic simulations of the forces exerted on and by users (astronauts, divers, etc.) as they work in various environments.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
Although more applications could be established, the STTR Phase I candidate PI has identified specific areas within the NASA domain that could experience more immediate implementation and thus benefit. The primary beneficiaries of this STTR Phase I project will the following NASA organizations:

1) Mission Operations -- Immersive training for mission and flight control support can be deployed for more effective results.

2) Engineering and Robotics -- Critical hardware advances will provide impetus for more innovative solutions to problems in orbital and space exploration circumstances as well as focusing on robotic technology implementation.

3) Life and Medical Sciences -- More creative hardware implementation and medical visualization and training will result as well.


POTENTIAL NON-NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
The ability to merge a wide variety of technologies, OpticFlex, biosensors, biomechanics software, enhanced by incorporating haptic response and autostereoscopic rendering to allow domain objects (NASA, oil/gas, medical, financial, automotive, etc.), could effectively simulate more real-world scenarios in both NASA and commercial/academic environments. This system would provide critical support to operator/situational awareness in key delivery of enhanced robustness and intelligence in simulation of task scenarios. For example, assimilating complex training scenarios with various gravitational force settings and functionalities would distinguish the Phase I results from other products as a viable commercial mission simulation or training visualization product. The innovative 3D visualization and simulation robotic scenario management would, in concert with the 3D man-in-the-loop concept would make feasible realistic collaboration between other virtual humans and robotic entities in synthetic environments within NASA and/or non-NASA settings.

NASA's technology taxonomy has been developed by the SBIR-STTR program to disseminate awareness of proposed and awarded R/R&D in the agency. It is a listing of over 100 technologies, sorted into broad categories, of interest to NASA.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Autonomous Reasoning/Artificial Intelligence
Computer System Architectures
Data Input/Output Devices
General Public Outreach
Highly-Reconfigurable
Human-Computer Interfaces
Human-Robotic Interfaces
Integrated Robotic Concepts and Systems
Intelligence
K-12 Outreach
Manipulation
Mission Training
Mobility
Operations Concepts and Requirements
Perception/Sensing
Sensor Webs/Distributed Sensors
Simulation Modeling Environment
Software Tools for Distributed Analysis and Simulation
Teleoperation


Form Printed on 09-19-05 13:14