NASA STTR 2005 Solicitation

FORM B - PROPOSAL SUMMARY


PROPOSAL NUMBER:05 T2.01-9887
RESEARCH SUBTOPIC TITLE:Flight Dynamic Systems Characterization
PROPOSAL TITLE:A Rapid Aeroelastic/Aeroservoelastic Modeling, Analysis and Optimization System for Advanced Flight Vehicles

SMALL BUSINESS CONCERN (SBC): RESEARCH INSTITUTION (RI):
NAME: Stirling Dynamics Inc NAME:The University of Washington
ADDRESS:4030 Lake Washington Blvd NE, Suite 205 ADDRESS:P.O. Box 352400
CITY:Kirkland CITY:Seattle
STATE/ZIP:WA  98033-7870 STATE/ZIP:WA  98195-2400
PHONE: (425) 827-7476 PHONE: (206) 543-1950

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR/PROJECT MANAGER (Name,Email)
Robert   Stirling
rstirling@stirling-dynamics.com

TECHNICAL ABSTRACT (LIMIT 200 WORDS)
Stirling Dynamics Inc and the University of Washington propose to develop a MATLAB toolbox for rapid aeroelastic (AE) and aeroservoelastic (ASE) modeling, analysis and optimization of flight vehicles. In practically all current aeroelastic analysis/optimization codes, model generation takes a considerable amount of effort, as does the processing of results. The proposed AE/ASE toolbox will provide user-friendly, mostly GUI-driven capabilities for rapid pre- and post-processing that will considerably decrease model generation effort and analysis/sensitivity cycle time compared to currently available tools. ASE toolbox users will have access to customizable databases containing organizational knowledge and standards for flight vehicle material properties, construction details, actuator/sensor models, airfoil shapes, etc. Model construction will be fully automated, eliminating time-consuming manual pre-processing. A full-range of ASE analyses and design sensitivities will be available within the MATLAB/Simulink environment. Utilities will be developed for importing and exporting computational model data (FEM, CFD, DLM, etc.) and results to and from the major commercial analysis codes. Key innovations include: 1) rapid model development, analysis, and optimization; 2) integration with the widespread and highly accessible MATLAB/Simulink computational environment; and 3) connectivity from MATLAB to more general purpose codes such as NASTRAN for higher fidelity follow-on analyses and model refinement.

POTENTIAL NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
Direct application of the STTR results to issues of current interest to NASA represents a prime opportunity where continued involvement in further product development and enhancement represents a considerable potential revenue stream in engineering support and future software sales. There are several avenues of potential commercial exploitation within NASA that include: 1) Engineering support and consulting work in future advanced vehicle projects, 2) Designs to meet specific performance requirements, 3) Interfacing of the software code with other aerospace vehicle design procedures, 4) Licensing of the software code, 5) Methods and software code development for advanced concept evolutions. The various divisions of NASA are engaged in many design, test and evaluation programs, ranging from general aviation aircraft to hypersonic waverider vehicles. All of these projects require increasingly sophisticated analysis tools and are potential customers for the proposed software capability.

POTENTIAL NON-NASA COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS (LIMIT 150 WORDS)
Components of the Department of Defense will have strong interest in the technology developed in this STTR project, such as the USAF, US Navy and DARPA, and those dealing with ballistic missile defense and guided missiles. Commercial and military aircraft manufacturers worldwide represent further major sales prospects, with applications in preliminary design cycles and in the need to achieve low structural weight. Several aircraft companies have plans to design vehicles for low cost access to space and will need advanced software tools in the design process to meet performance objectives. From their very nature, advanced vehicle designs with light weight structure are likely to encounter problems with vibration and dynamic loads response due to aeroelastic characteristics. The proposed aeroelastic/aeroservoelastic optimization methods will offer a very useful design tool for these applications, which will provide additional research, development and product sales opportunities arising from the STTR project.

NASA's technology taxonomy has been developed by the SBIR-STTR program to disseminate awareness of proposed and awarded R/R&D in the agency. It is a listing of over 100 technologies, sorted into broad categories, of interest to NASA.

TECHNOLOGY TAXONOMY MAPPING
Airframe
Controls-Structures Interaction (CSI)
Launch and Flight Vehicle
Manned-Manuvering Units
Simulation Modeling Environment
Software Development Environments
Software Tools for Distributed Analysis and Simulation
Structural Modeling and Tools


Form Printed on 09-19-05 13:14